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High level framework for process safety management

The EI Process Safety Committee has developed High level framework for process safety management ('PSM framework'), a comprehensive process safety management framework which captures industry good practice in process safety management (PSM).  It provides the energy industry with a consistent and effective approach to answer two key questions with confidence:  

1. How will we assure the integrity of the operation?
2. How will we know we are doing it?

EI PSM framework provides a common understanding of requirements for all levels in the organisation from senior management through to operational staff and provides a consistent basis for discussion with regulators, insurers and other stakeholders.

PSM swiss cheese

Purchase or download this publication

EI PSM framework (High level framework for process safety management, first edition, December 2010, ISBN 978 0 85293 584 2) is freely available for download for single users, or can be purchased in hard copy format. (Note: register for free to download)

Development of EI PSM framework

The EI PSM framework was developed with input from experienced practitioners from all sectors of the energy industry; significantly, representatives participated from the industrial insurance sector and the UK health, safety and environment regulators. The EI PSM framework is unique in that it has been developed by the energy industry for the energy industry.

A 'work in progress' report of the initial workshop to develop EI PSM Framework was published (Technical workshop proceedings: Initial report - Framework for high-level process safety management, March 2010, ISBN 978 0 85293 553 8); whilst still available, it has been largely usurped by publication of EI PSM framework

Overview of EI PSM framework

There are four 'focus areas' defining the key high level components of the EI PSM framework. Within each of the focus areas are a number of 'elements', 20 in total, which set out the key aspects of the operation that organisations need to get right. Each of these elements contains a number of 'expectations' which set out a more detailed definition of what they need to do in order to assure the integrity of the operation.

Focus areas

There are four 'focus areas' defining the key high level components of the EI PSM framework.

Process safety leadership
This shows how organisations should define and communicate the level of performance they are prepared to accept from the business and how they will ensure that they put in place the necessary resources to achieve the required level of performance.

Risk identification & assessment
This provides guidance on how organisations should identify and assess the risks that they need to manage in order to assure the integrity of their operations, how they should identify the necessary control measures and how they should record and maintain the process safety knowledge that they develop from these risk identification & assessment activities.

Risk management
This sets out how organisations should implement and manage the different categories of control measures that have been identified during the risk assessment activities.

Review & improvement
This defines how organisations should measure and review their compliance with the expectations of the EI PSM framework and how they should ensure that they learn from these measurements and the finding from investigations.

Elements in each focus area

Within each focus area are a number of 'elements' 20 in total, which set out the key aspects of the operations that organisations need to get right. Each of these elements contains a number of 'expectations' which set out a more detailed definition of what they need to do in order to assure the integrity of the operation.

Process safety leadership

There are five elements within the process safety leadership focus area.

1.   Leadership commitment & responsibility
Assurance of the integrity of an organisation's operation requires visible leadership commitment and accountability at all levels of the organisation.

2.   Identification & compliance with legislation & industry standards
Compliance with legislation is a fundamental requirement for organisations.

3.   Employee selection, placement, competency & health assurance
Control of operations depend upon having competent people in position.

4.   Workforce involvement
Achieving high levels of HS&E and process safety performance requires the commitment of the whole workforce.

5.   Communication with stakeholders
Establishing and maintaining stakeholders' confidence is a key factor in maintaining an organisation's licence to operate.

Risk identification & assessment

There are two elements within the risk identification & assessment focus area.

6.   Hazard identification & risk assessment
A fundamental requirement of any HS&E and process safety management system is the identification and assessment of risk.

7.   Documentation, records & knowledge management
Accurate records and information are essential to identify, assess and manage HS&E and process safety risk.

Risk management

There are 11 elements within the risk management focus area.

8.   Operating manuals & procedures
Operation of facilities within established parameters and according to legislation is an essential aspect of HS&E and process safety.

9.   Process & operational status monitoring & handover
Comprehensive process and operational status monitoring and effective handover between work groups are essential to assure the continued integrity of the organisation's operations.

10.   Management of operational interfaces
Operational interfaces with third parties, who provide or receive services, utilities, or products may impact the organisation's operations.

11.   Standards & practices
HS&E and process safety performance is enhanced by using robust standards and safe working practices.

12.   Management of change & project management
The introduction of any form of change into an organisation, if not appropriately managed, can significantly increase the levels of HS&E and process safety risk.

13.    Operational readiness & process start-up
The commissioning and start-up of new, modified or existing plant and equipment is a high risk operation.

14.   Emergency preparedness
The consequences of an incident can be significantly reduced if the organisation is appropriately prepared to handle potential emergency situations.

15.   Inspection & maintenance
Maintaining the integrity of plant and equipment is an essential requirement for HS&E and process safety.

16.    Management of safety critical devices
An essential requirement for HS&E and process safety is that safety critical equipment and devices (SCDs) are in service and operating correctly.

17.    Work control, permit-to-work & task risk management
The execution of maintenance and project work activities, if not appropriately managed, can significantly increase the levels of HS&E and process safety risk.

18.    Contractor & supplier, selection & management
Third parties doing work on the organisation's behalf may impact its operations and its reputation.

Review & improvement

Within the review & improvement focus area there are two elements.

19.    Incident reporting & investigation
An essential aspect of HS&E and process safety performance improvement is learning from incidents and 'near hits' and taking appropriate action to prevent their recurrence.

20.     Audit, assurance, management review & intervention
Regular review and audit of compliance with the EI PSM framework is vital to ensure that HS&E and process safety performance continue to meet the defined targets.

Expectations in each element

Each of the 20 elements contains a number of 'expectations' which set out a more detailed definition of what organisations need to do in order to assure the integrity of the operation. They commence with an overview that sets out why that element is important and what management must do to ensure that this is adequately addressed. Each element then has 4 - 17 expectations. Each element concludes with common expectations regarding assessing whether arrangements are in place and followed, and review of compliance and performance trends.

There follows an example set of expectations for one element.

Element 5 Communication with stakeholders

Overview:
Establishing and maintaining stakeholders' confidence is a key factor in maintaining an organisation's licence to operate.

Management must identify key stakeholder groups and develop and maintain a good working relationship with them, understanding and addressing their issues and concerns.

5.1: A defined communications system supports the organisation to identify, develop and  maintain a good working relationship with the statutory and non-statutory stakeholders about its activities, including emergency response communications.

5.2: Organisations ensure and demonstrate that the consultation process with statutory and non-statutory stakeholders is appropriate and proportionate, and follows a defined process.

5.3: Appropriate HS&E and process safety information is published in the public domain to demonstrate the organisation's commitment to continually improving its performance.

5.4: Effectiveness of programmes for communication with stakeholders is regularly reviewed by specified levels of management.

5.5: Arrangements for communication with stakeholders are understood and followed; understanding of arrangements and compliance with them is regularly tested.

5.6 Compliance and performance trends are reviewed by specified levels of management.

Links

The EI has produced further tools and guidance on process safety under the direction of the EI Process Safety Committee, including the PSM guidelines and the EI Process Safety Survey (EIPSS) which is based on the PSM framework.