Statistical Review of World Energy

The Energy Institute Statistical Review of World Energy™ analyses data on world energy markets from the prior year. Previously produced by bp, the Review has been providing timely, comprehensive and objective data to the energy community since 1952.

The new 2024 edition of the EI Statistical Review of World Energy will be published on Thursday 20 June 2024, providing free-to-access data on global energy production, consumption, trade and emissions for the full year 2023. Register to attend the global launch webcast.

In collaboration with:

Data compilation by:

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With the continuing support of bp.

The Statistical Review continues to be full, first and free: the fullest, most reliable account of energy production, consumption, trade and emissions; the first data source to provide a complete global picture of the previous year; and completely free to access for users.
Dr Nick Wayth CEng FEI FIMechE,
Chief Executive, Energy Institute
Juliet Davenport photo
We have seen further and ever more dangerous impacts of climate change across all continents. And despite broad consensus on the need to reach net zero, global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions are still heading in the wrong direction.
Juliet Davenport OBE HonFEI,
President, Energy Institute

Publishing the 72nd Statistical Review of World Energy is a significant moment for the Energy Institute (EI).

As the chartered professional membership body for people who work across the world of energy, the EI and its precursor bodies date back more than a century. This major addition to our body of work underpins our determination to bring the best evidence to bear in the vital decisions made by the business community, policy makers and academics in energy.

With our partners KPMG and Kearney, the continuing involvement of Heriot-Watt University and with enormous thanks to bp for seven decades’ work building one of the world’s most respected energy data sources, we are opening a new chapter in the story of the Statistical Review.

It continues to be full, first and free: the fullest, most reliable account of energy production, consumption, trade and emissions; the first data source to provide a complete global picture of the previous year; and completely free to access for users.

This year more than ever, it provides insight into how our energy systems are adapting to escalating environmental and geopolitical crises. The data contained shed light on a year in energy defined by three crises layered one on top of the other – on supply, price and climate.

Just as the world emerged from the huge impact on energy demand caused by the global pandemic, 2022 witnessed energy markets again in crisis, as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine upended assumptions about supply and sent out ripples around the world. That in turn precipitated a price crisis and profound cost-of-living pressures across many economies.

More fundamentally, we have seen further and ever more dangerous impacts of climate change across all continents. And despite broad consensus on the need to reach net zero, global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions are still heading in the wrong direction.

The Statistical Review provides a high level view of the global energy system, of how global markets are faring under these pressures, and how the energy transition is evolving.

At the EI, the Statistical Review has a new, long-term, independent home. Users will find all of the familiar elements – both in print and online. We look forward to working with the user community to ensure it stays relevant as we work together to accelerate the transition to a cleaner, more secure energy future.

Juliet Davenport OBE HonFEI, President, Energy Institute
Dr Nick Wayth CEng FEI FIMechE, CEO, Energy Institute

2022: Key charts

In 2022, the energy system switched from concerns around demand post-COVID to supply concerns arising from conflict in Ukraine. These charts summarize some of the key highlights from this year’s Statistical Review.

Primary energy icon Primary energy

Primary energy demand growth slowed compared to 2021, increasing 1.1% (6.6 EJ) in 2022 compared to 5.5% (31 EJ) in 2021. Primary energy in 2022 was 16 EJ above 2019 pre-COVID levels with consumption increasing in all regions apart from Europe (-3.8%) and CIS (-5.8%).

Since 2019, primary energy consumption in non-OECD countries increased by just over 20 EJ, driven largely by growth in China (15 EJ) accounting for 72% of the increase. Energy demand in OECD countries remain at 2019 levels with demand of 234 EJ in 2022 compared to 238 EJ in 2019. The increase in primary energy supply between 2019 and 2022 was largely driven by renewable (excluding hydro) energy sources (13.5 EJ) and coal (10.6 EJ), with increased gas production (2.7 EJ) also evident.

Wind turbines

"Primary energy in 2022 reached a record level with non-OECD countries accounting for most of the increase."

"Primary energy use in 2022 was 2.8% above 2019 levels."

Carbon emissions icon Carbon emissions

Emissions from energy continued to rebound strongly reaching a record high of 39.3 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent representing a 0.8% increase over 2021. Emissions from energy consumption contributed 87% of total global emissions.

"Global greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise reaching record levels in 2022."

Oil icon Oil

Global energy prices rose sharply in 2022 driven by energy supply concerns.

The most pronounced increase was in the price of lithium carbonate, which increased by over 300% in 2022.

Oil prices rose by around 40%, with Brent ending the year averaging around $101/bbl. Gas (Netherlands TFF) prices increased by over 130% to average around 37 $mmBTU, while coal prices also saw an increase with Northwest Europe marker price increasing by 142% to 294 $/tonne.

"Natural gas prices reached record levels in Europe and Asia Pacific regions."

Sources:
Brent: S&P Global Platts, ©2023, S&P Global Inc.
TTF: ICIS Heren Energy Ltd
Northwest Europe marker price: S&P Global Platts, ©2023, S&P Global Inc.
Cobalt: London Metal Exchange
Lithium carbonate: Benchmark Mineral Intelligence
Percentage changes use the latest data available as of June 2023

Oil demand icon Oil demand

Oil demand in 2022 was 0.65 Mb/d (0.7%) below 2019 levels. Gasoline (25%) and diesel/gasoil (29%) account for just over half of total demand.

Although aviation-related oil demand exhibited the strongest pre-pandemic recovery relative to 2021, it remained more than 1.7 Mb/d below 2019 levels.

Demand for gasoline in 2022 was similar to pre-pandemic levels, while demand for naphtha, diesel/gasoil, fuel oil and other oil products in 2022 were above their pre-pandemic levels.

Naphtha demand fell between 2021 and 2022, while demand for all other products increased.

Power by fuel icon Power by fuel

The share of renewables (excluding hydro) in global power generation continued its rising trend, driven by record new build of solar and wind. Their share of total global electricity production reached 14% in 2022, higher than that of nuclear energy (9%). The share of coal in the power sector stood at around 35% whilst the share of gas generation in 2022 remained close to its 10-year average level at 23%.

"Solar and wind recorded a record increase of 266 GW in 2022 with Solar accounting for 72% of the capacity additions."

Oil, gas and coal trade icon Oil, gas and coal trade

Russian natural gas (pipeline and LNG) accounted for around 33% of Europe’s total gas imports in 2022.

Crude oil from Russia made up 23% of total European crude oil imports.

Russian coal contributed 30% of Europe’s coal imports in 2022..

“Russia accounted for around 19% of Europe’s gas supply in 2022.”